english girl at home

A Sewing & Knitting Blog, Made in Birmingham, England


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Altered Wharf Street Pullover

Wharf Street Pullover by Hannah Fettig

During 2016 (and following being one of the winners of the We Wear Knitbot Competition), I was extremely flattered to be asked to test knit a pattern from Hannah Fettig‘s upcoming book, Texture.

I selected the Wharf Street Pullover, and it was a reminder that I am still a relatively inexperienced knitter as it took me far longer than the testing period to knit and I missed the deadline for feedback, plus my finished jumper (blogged in 2017) ended up excessively long in the body and sleeves.

Wharf Street Pullover by Hannah Fettig

Unsurprisingly, I didn’t get a lot of wear from a tunic length jumper, so last year I built up the courage to finally alter it. Since the pattern is knit bottom-up, it isn’t possible to unravel from the bottom. Instead you need to decide where you want to remove length from, cut into the jumper at this point, and then unravel downwards, towards the hem. Due to the honeycomb cables it wasn’t quite as simple as that, since the yarn didn’t want to unravel and needed quite a lot of untangling.

Wharf Street Pullover by Hannah Fettig

As it was my first time removing length from a jumper in this way, I started by cutting into the jumper lower down and unravelling that section, then repeated the process higher up. Once the jumper was a length I was happy with I picked the stitches back up and replaced the ribbing. I repeated this process for the body and the sleeves, and the resulting jumper is much more wearable and flattering

Wharf Street Pullover by Hannah Fettig

These pictures were taken in front of a warehouse which is located right by Barry’s Fabrics. No wonder I look happy in the picture below, I’m probably plotting what fabric/s I am about to buy.

Wharf Street Pullover by Hannah Fettig

My current knitting project is a Hannah Fettig design, Trail Jacket, which should be a relatively quick knit. My all-time most worn knitting project, the Hancock Cardigan, is also by Hannah and at some point I really must knit another as it’s the perfect cardi for throwing over any outfit.

Wharf Street Pullover by Hannah Fettig

Phil is busy laying tiles in our kitchen as I type, so I’ll leave you to show solidarity by preparing some lunch. I’m awaiting the imminent arrival of an embossing label ‘printer’, with which I plan to annotate a book of my sewing plans – sounds like a perfect Sunday afternoon.

Wharf Street Pullover by Hannah Fettig

P.S. the yarn used was the yarn suggested in the pattern; Quince & Co’s Owl (worsted 50% American wool, 50% alpaca, which is spun and dyed in USA) in the ‘mesa’ colourway.

Wharf Street Pullover by Hannah Fettig

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Holiday Snaps & Meandering Thoughts

Purl Alpaca Malachi Vest

Phil and I dragged out the Christmas holiday as long as possible, spending a few days in Alicante before returning to work this week.

These pictures, of garments I’ve previously blogged, were taken while we were away (Malachi Vest / In the Folds Jumpsuit / Tamarack Jacket). I didn’t spend a lot of time sewing over Christmas, but did start the process of making two coats (one for me and one for Phil). I’m taking my time attaching interfacing and canvas, resisting the impulse to rush ahead to construction, in order to create coats which should look, and last, all the better for it.

Purl Alpaca Malachi Vest

I wanted to thank everyone who read, or got in touch about, my recent post regarding my experience with my previous employer. A few people who commented used the word ‘proud’ which led me to recall a memory from the time which I thought was worth sharing, and which I didn’t touch on in my previous post, since I kept that largely to a blow-by-blow account.

Purl Alpaca Malachi Vest

At my lowest point working for that employer I spent one week off work, and in bed, recovering from a combination of stress and anaemia. Amongst the many emotions I felt at that time, I realised that I felt ashamed.

Grainline Studio Tamarack Jacket

Ashamed because, in a work context, I had come to view myself as a ‘strong’ person, and this had become central to my concept of – and what I valued about – myself. Certainly my concept of what constituted strength in this context (including being willing and able to work as long and hard as anyone, to take on more work and work out of hours without complaint and without getting stressed) was promoted by my employer (in my first interview for the organisation, when I was hired, I was asked about my willingness to work over and above my hours. I told them it wasn’t an issue, and meant it). However, my employer can’t take all the blame, they had simply built on an existing prejudice I held.

Grainline Studio Tamarack Jacket

How I felt at that time, physically and emotionally weak, but without a physical cause to attribute my symptoms to in order to ‘justify’ them to myself and to my employer, was incompatible with my own (and my employer’s) prejudice about what it was to be a strong person.

In the Folds Peppermint Magazine Jumpsuit

Initially I was ashamed because my view of what I valued in myself was challenged, but once I had time to dwell on it I was ashamed that I’d been judging people (predominantly myself, but inevitably, if unconsciously, my colleagues too) against a practically feudal concept. It took being physically weak to teach me that my concept of a ‘strong’ person was a nonsense, and that by judging myself against it I had set myself up to fail.

It was a humbling lesson, but in learning it I hope to be kinder to myself and others in future.

In the Folds Peppermint Magazine Jumpsuit


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Drapey Mustard Linden

Mustard Grainline Studio Linden Sweatshirt

Another week, another Linden!

This Linden features a very simple ‘hack’, and is my entry for the “Stitched with a Twist” Instagram challenge. I’ve been planning to make this Linden since last March when I spotted the sweatshirt below in an email from Uniqlo. I thought it would be easy to recreate using the Linden pattern with the simple addition of some gathering at the neckline (I also fancy recreating the dress on the right with Named’s Inari Dress).

The fabric is from Guthrie & Ghani, and was purchased during their Fifth Birthday Party back in April. I picked an especially drapey knit so that the neckline gathers wouldn’t be too stiff. The fabric feels lovely and has a great sheen to it.

Mustard Grainline Studio Linden Sweatshirt

I added 5 inches at the neckline of the pattern front to accommodate the gathering. To more closely imitate the inspiration image, I should have reduced the length at the hem and widened the neckband, but I didn’t think about that until after it was constructed.

Mustard Grainline Studio Linden Sweatshirt

We’ve been to a comic con today, and managed to capture some pictures outside, just in time, as it was getting dark. Birmingham was hectic, so I’m now recovering in my pyjamas, with a mulled drink, and a trashy Christmas film on Netflix. I might even get back to bauble knitting shortly for full Christmassy atmosphere.

Mustard Grainline Studio Linden Sweatshirt

Mustard Grainline Studio Linden Sweatshirt

Mustard Grainline Studio Linden Sweatshirt


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Craftine Box Grace Dress

Simple Sew Grace Dress

Recently, I got the opportunity to try out Craftine Box a sewing subscription box based in France and now available in the UK, which is released every two months.

I’ve recorded a vlog with an unboxing and some footage of my finished project. I’d also recommend having a look at their Blog if you’d like to see inside some more recent boxes (mine was the February edition). In the time since I received my box, Craftine have begun providing two sewing pattern options inside each box which is a great feature, as it’s twice as likely you’ll be interested in making an included project!

I used the fabric in the Craftine Box I received to make a Simple Sew Grace Dress, which I received free with an issue of Love Sewing (issue 30), and which I’ve made previously.

Simple Sew Grace Dress

This is a great simple dress pattern, which I’ve now made successfully in woven and knit fabrics. I have another version of the Grace Dress to blog, as I sewed two at once this time. If I make it again I’m going to try the capped sleeve version, for a slightly different silhouette.

Simple Sew Grace Dress

I’m in the second week of a new job. I was exhausted every evening of my first week – it was a relatively quiet start but something about being in a new environment is so tiring! I’ve got more energy this week and am using the time saved from my much shorter commute to get more done in the evening, such as blogging and vlogging. In my previous job I never had enough energy after the commute home to sew in the evening, so I’m hoping that will change and I might make progress on some of the sewing projects I’m really excited about very soon. I also have lots of (Christmas) knitting planned!

Simple Sew Grace Dress

Despite living in Birmingham for my entire life my new job is the first I have had based in Birmingham City Centre, which, consequently, is also where these photos were taken (in The Custard Factory to be specific)!

Simple Sew Grace Dress

Simple Sew Grace Dress

Simple Sew Grace Dress

Simple Sew Grace Dress

Simple Sew Grace Dress

Disclaimer: I was provided with a free Craftine Box; all opinions expressed are my own.


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Sangria Dress in Bamboo & Cotton Jersey

Capital Chic Patterns Sangria Dress

It’s taken me ages to get around to sharing this dress, which is a Capital Chic Patterns Sangria. As someone who rarely sews a pattern multiple times, you know I love this pattern when I tell you I have made three (version 1 here), and will definitely make more. (I still need to blog my second Sangria, which was sewn in a metallic, pink, snakeskin-print jersey and consequently doesn’t get worn much, but was still totally worth it!).

Capital Chic Patterns Sangria Dress

The pattern recommends using scuba jersey, but I especially like it in softer jerseys; it’s comfy, and has the added benefit that you can skip the centre back zip, making it a very quick sew. This version is sewn in a Combstooth Bamboo Organic Cotton Jersey from Offset Warehouse, purchased in-person at the Sewing Bee Live. It’s a lovely soft french terry, smooth on the right-side, with a soft texture on the reverse. It has enough body and recovery to work for a bodycon dress, whilst also being very comfortable.

Capital Chic Patterns Sangria Dress

The only danger of sewing such a fitted dress in a very stretchy fabric is that I’ve twice popped the hem stitches being over zealous. The dress is currently waiting for me to resew the hem (must do it, and not delay a five minute task for six months!).

Capital Chic Patterns Sangria Dress

I think this is a great all-year dress, it works with tights and a cardigan in the winter, and with ballet pumps in the summer. I want to return to my other favourite from the same Capital Chic Patterns collection, the Cuba Libre shirt, again this year.

Capital Chic Patterns Sangria Dress

These photos were taken during a recent-ish holiday to Majorca. I suspect it was whilst exploring the castle ramparts that I forgot how fitted my dress was and popped the hem stitches for the second time.

Capital Chic Patterns Sangria Dress

I’ve had a sewing-focused day today, which has included catching up on sewing blogs, vlogs and podcasts, sewing a top (Simplicity 8593), and writing this blog post. I’m going to see if I can squeeze in cutting out my next sewing project before heading to bed feeling very smug.

Capital Chic Patterns Sangria Dress

Capital Chic Patterns Sangria Dress

Capital Chic Patterns Sangria Dress